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    How bad is California’s housing crisis for renters?

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    BY MANUELA TOBIAS

    CalMatters

    Things don’t look great for tenants in California.

    After more than two years, statewide eviction protections are over, and landlords will be allowed to bump up rents on some apartments by as much as 10% come Aug. 1 — the maximum allowed under state law thanks to ballooning inflation rates.

    As with any California housing crisis story, though, it’s complicated. In some cities, the end of statewide eviction laws has meant the start of even stronger local protections, such as bans on evictions over non-payment of rent in Los Angeles and San Francisco.

    And if you’re lucky enough to live in a rent-controlled unit in Los Angeles — which make up about three quarters of the rental stock in the city — rent hikes are also prohibited until at least next summer.

    Confused? So are tenants and landlords.

    On this episode of “Gimme Shelter: The California Housing Crisis Podcast,” CalMatters’ Manuela Tobias and the Los Angeles Times’ Liam Dillon walk through the patchwork of laws with Ari Chazanas, a landlord who manages about 1,000 apartments across Los Angeles, and Kamilah Miller, a child care worker in Antioch in the East Bay who’s long battled housing insecurity..

    “It felt like you almost needed to take a college course breaking down and analyzing what you can do and what you can’t do, and it’s still confusing for the most part,” Chazanas said.

    Meanwhile, Miller, one of the hundreds of thousands of tenants helped by the state’s rent relief program, worries about making next month’s rent.

    “I don’t have it coming up,” she said. “I’m not quite sure what we’re going to do next month. And it’s not even next month. We’re counting down the days.”


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    Dotty Pringle
    Dotty Pringle
    16 days ago

    We have property management companies pocketing money and harassing tenants with false maintenance bills, fraud and unlicensed people acting as property nannies to a point of criminal activity. When you force a rent increase by way of promising an improvement and don’t do the improvement….that’s fraud, some property managers are ripping homeowners off during these times too. We really need to audit some of these companies now. Citizens Group to watch
    these companies should be thought of. Property Managers should by law, have their CPM.

    chris
    chris
    19 days ago

    CA is a flagship of unstoppable liberal failure. Fraud is now all in the open as the hot air balloon is rapidly deflating.
    National emarassment really after the black “woman” who doesn’t know what “woman” is has been nominated to increasingly irrelevant scotus by that idiotic chinese fraud.
    And under leadership of chinese assets like clueless pelosi (not even 90 yet))), it is obvious where CA is headed.
    So sorry…

    Last edited 19 days ago by chris
    Sheryl Hamlin
    20 days ago

    Redfin has expanded its website to include rentals as a sign of the times: https://www.redfin.com/rentals

    Also, there are large tracts of single family homes now under construction in Arizona that are going to be for rent, another sign of the times as the sales slump on real estate. A developer can rent the homes for 20 years, pay off his expenses and then sell them and make good money.

    Dotty Pringle
    Dotty Pringle
    16 days ago
    Reply to  Sheryl Hamlin

    Is that the whole tract that has no water available? Was in the news.

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