How Long Will You Live? Your Zip Code Tells All

prostate arial, price sans-serif; font-size: 12pt;”>California Endowment CEO Dr. Robert K. Ross, symptoms California State Treasurer John Chiang, and other influential elected officials discuss how where you live directly affects how long you’ll live.

Celebrity Activist George Takei explains in a groundbreaking video

 On Saturday, April 16, 2016, California leaders, headed by CA State Treasurer John Chiang, joined thought leaders of The California Endowment (TCE) in a roundtable discussion of how inequities in race, education and income have greater impact on health than doctor’s visits. “The difference between those who succeed and those who have not succeeded yet is opportunity,” said Chiang in response to the startling fact that health is determined more by one’s zip code than their genetic code. “85% of what influences your health has nothing to do with your access to doctors or what you choose to do,” said Dr. Robert K. Ross, CEO of the California Endowment. “It has more to do with the environment we live in and your options within those environments.”

In a groundbreaking animated video, “A Tale of Two Zip Codes,” celebrity activist George Takei explains that those who live in more affluent communities will live an average of 15 years longer than their neighbors in disadvantaged communities. “Your zip code shouldn’t determine how long you live, but it does,” said Dr. Anthony Iton, TCE’s Senior Vice President for Healthy Communities. “In fact, health has more to do with place than doctors’ visits. The odds are stacked against low-income communities and communities of color, these problems are manmade and they can be unmade.”

The Roundtable, held as part of The California Endowment’s 20th Anniversary, was an opportunity for TCE Executives to share the remarkable progress of its $1 billion dollar initiative, Building Healthy Communities, (BHC). Launched in 2010, BHC is now mid-way through its 10-year plan and is working to transform 14 of California’s communities most devastated by health inequities, into places where all people have an opportunity to thrive.

“Building Healthy Communities gets into the underlying root causes of racial, educational, health and socio-economic disparities, engages communities, and actually remakes those environments so that opportunity structures are available for all,” said Iton. “We put together this animated video to help people understand, in an entertaining way, that we should change the way we think about health.” In the Roundtable, what started out as a conversation about health and access to care evolved into a conversation about inequality and how all these factors influence each other. “It’s time to double-down,” said CA Senator Ricardo Lara.

Building on TCE Senior Vice President Dan Zingale’s comment about local action successfully effecting state and national change, Los Angeles City Councilman David Ryu said, “it starts with the little things like banning tobacco, or creating a Student Savings Account that encourages savings at the elementary school levels, which in turn increases high school and college attendance rates. We fully support your mission at the city level and look to our brothers in the state to do the same.”

The Building Healthy Communities Halftime Report cited more than 100 such local community successes as #Health4All, #DoTheMath, #Agua4All, and others; all of which cited strategies based on inclusion, community action and empowerment. “We need to celebrate our cultural, religious and orientational differences. We have to understand that’s part of our fabric, that’s what makes us unique, and that’s making us successful. As a State, we need to make sure we work through these together. These investments in local opportunities are incredibly significant because California leads the way in changing what Americans think and do,” said California State Treasurer John Chiang. “California is where America is going to be in 2050.”

TCE supports your needs for additional information, photos and footage. Please contact Janice O’Malley Galizio for more information or additional requests.

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L-R: Dr. Robert K. Ross, CEO of The California Endowment; CA State Treasurer John Chiang; Dr. Tony Iton, SVP of The California Endowment; Shan Cretin, Board member of The California Endowment California State Treasurer John Chiang joins The California Endowment’s Executive Team in a Roundtable Discussion on why zip codes matter more than genetic codes when it comes to health.

The California Endowment Executive Team

  • California Endowment Board CEO – Robert K. Ross, MD
  • California Endowment Senior Vice President – Anthony Iton, MD, MPH, JD
  • California Endowment Senior Vice President – Daniel Zingale
  • California Endowment Board Member – Shan Cretin
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State and local leaders join The California Endowment’s Executive Team in a Roundtable Discussion on why zip codes matter more than genetic codes when it comes to health. Back left: California Air Resources Board Member Hector De La Torre Left to Right: Los Angeles City Councilmember David Ryu; California State Treasurer John Chiang; Los Angeles Community College District Trustee Mike Fong; CA Endowment SVP Dr. Tony Iton; Boardmember Shan Cretin; CEO Dr. Robert Ross; CA Senator Ricardo Lara; Damián Mazzotta, General Manager of the newspaper La Opinión; Los Angeles Community College District Trustee Mike Eng and Garvey Unified School District member Henry Lo. Not in picture: Del Norte County Unified School District Superintendent Jeff Harris; Los Angeles Community College District Trustee Sydney Kamlager; Long Beach City Councilmember Al Austin II

California State and Local Elected Leaders

  • California State Treasurer John Chiang
  • California State Senator Ricardo Lara
  • Long Beach City Councilmember Al Austin II
  • Los Angeles City Councilmember David Ryu
  • Los Angeles Community College District Trustee Mike Eng
  • Los Angeles Community College District Trustee Mike Fong
  • Los Angeles Community College District Trustee Sydney Kamlager
  • Garvey Unified School District Member Henry Lo
  • California Air Resources Board Member Hector De La Torre
  • Del Norte County Unified School Superintendent Jeff Harris

 

About California Endowment

The California Endowment, a private, statewide health foundation, was established in 1996 to expand access to quality health care for underserved individuals and communities, and to promote fundamental affordable improvements in the health status of all Californians. The Endowment challenges the conventional wisdom that medical settings and individual choices are solely responsible for people’s health. At its core, The Endowment believes that health happens in neighborhoods, schools, and with prevention. For more information, visit The California Endowment’s homepage at www.calendow.org.

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California State Treasurer John Chiang (center) shares a light moment with Building Healthy Communities Teams who have made Exercising the Right Vote and Youth Empowerment their priority

About Building Healthy Communities (BHC)

Building Healthy Communities (BHC) is a 10 year, $1 billion comprehensive community initiative launched by The California Endowment in 2010 to advance statewide policy, change the narrative, and transform 14 of California’s communities most devastated by health inequities into places where all people have an opportunity to thrive.

Your zip code shouldn’t determine how long you live, but it does. In fact, health has more to do with place than doctors’ visits. The odds are stacked against low-income communities and communities of color. Building Healthy Communities is about changing rules at the local and state levels so that everyone is valued and has access to the resources and opportunities essential for health: affordable

One Response to How Long Will You Live? Your Zip Code Tells All

  1. William "Bill" Hicks April 21, 2016 at 8:40 am

    “Building Healthy Communities”……….Is it just a hidden agenda of income redistribution in the name of “fairness”?

    Reply

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