Home » Posts tagged with » AIER (Page 3)

They’re Coming For You

They’re Coming For You

Commentary by Antony Davies For years, politicians have claimed that the rich weren’t paying their “fair share.” While it’s taken a decade or more for voters to catch wind of the truth, people are finally beginning to realize that the rich actually pay far more than the rest of us. According to Congressional Budget Office […]

Since Viking Times, The Nordics Have Been Different

Since Viking Times, The Nordics Have Been Different

by Joakim Book Why the Nordic countries – Finland, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, and Iceland – are different from the rest of the world has long fascinated scholars and political pundits alike. The left wants to know the recipe for Big Government so that they can successfully implement it in their home countries; the right wants […]

Poverty Isn’t Just About Money: Expanding The Child Tax Credit

Poverty Isn’t Just About Money: Expanding The Child Tax Credit

  by Veronique de Rugy The Wall Street Journal’s editors have written another great editorial, this time on the expansion of the child tax credit into a Universal Basic Income for children. Parents can now claim a maximum of $3,000 for those ages 6 to 17 and up and $3,600 for children under age 6, up from […]

An Armor Conspired: The Global Shipping Freeze

An Armor Conspired: The Global Shipping Freeze

by Peter C. Earle Despite numerous personal shortcomings, Jim Morrison of The Doors regularly evinced considerable writing talents. In the poem-song Horse Latitudes, he describes the conditions under which stalled galleons would, drifting listlessly at certain latitudes, jettison cargo so as to make their craft more susceptible to the slightest winds. The lyrics begin as follows: When the […]

The “Fortune Of The Commons”: Why Are There Still Blueberries In The Fields?

The “Fortune Of The Commons”: Why Are There Still Blueberries In The Fields?

by Joakim Book I live in quite a sparsely-populated place, with lots of wilderness and nature. This time of year, we have plenty of late-summer berries in season, and it isn’t uncommon to find stray hikers hunched over bushes eagerly picking blueberries and crowberries. This is what most people, economists included, would expect: Mother Nature […]

The Irony Of China’s Most Recent Bitcoin Ban

The Irony Of China’s Most Recent Bitcoin Ban

by Peter C. Earle Various aspects of cryptocurrency use have been banned in China numerous times over the better part of the last decade. The most stringent barriers yet, though, were announced on Friday, September 24th. In a series of statements, Chinese economic planners listed their edicts in stepwise fashion, including no financial supports or […]

The Costly But Deliberate U.S. Labor Shortage

The Costly But Deliberate U.S. Labor Shortage

by Richard M. Salsman For more than a year, due mainly to illiberal policies associated with Covid-phobia and lockdowns, the U.S. has experienced various types and magnitudes of labor shortages. In short, the quantity of labor demanded by would-be employers has exceeded quantities supplied by would-be employees, especially in the service sector. The phenomenon is […]

Corporate Welfare: Where’s the Outrage? A Review

by David Waugh It is fashionable for politicians like Senator Sanders to point to corporations as beneficiaries of socialist government policies. To their credit, they are correct. So what is corporate socialism? In their excellent book Multilateral Disarmament: A State Compact to End Corporate Welfare, Byron Schlomach, Stephen Slivinski, and James M. Hohman provide a […]

Remdesivir And Lessons In Pandemic Drug Approvals

Remdesivir And Lessons In Pandemic Drug Approvals

by Michael Fumento Call it the result of the Covid pandemic attitude of “Do something, anything!” That’s alongside the lockdowns, exhortations to wear ever more masks at one time, bizarre travel restrictions, and all sorts of goofy alleged remedies like wearing face shields on top of the head, alcohol mats to prevent transmission through shoe […]

What Is Money, Anyway?

What Is Money, Anyway?

by  David Gillette One of the most important aspects of economics that people should understand better is money. Recall your first paycheck, not an allowance for chores around the home, but for real work where you risked losing that employment. For our purposes – and perhaps for cultural anthropologists, since they gather data about such […]