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Lioness of the Senate

Lioness of the Senate

By Phil Erwin In his later years, Ted Kennedy was known as the “Liberal Lion of the Senate.” He didn’t exactly live up to the respectability implied by that moniker. But Democrats so revered the Kennedys, they forgave Ted his disgraceful behavior at Chappaquiddick and kept right on re-electing him despite his well-known moral failings. […]

Our First Amendment’s Betrayal

Our First Amendment’s Betrayal

    By Richard A. Nixon In 1791, two years subsequent to the ratification of the Constitution in the main, the first Ten Amendments, aka, the Bill of Rights was ratified. Its purpose was to make clear that notwithstanding the creation of the federal government in 1789, its authority was defined and limited. The 10th […]

Due Process: Criminals vs. property owners

Due Process: Criminals vs. property owners

  By Jeremy Talcott One of America’s most cherished constitutional guarantees is the promise that no one may be deprived of life, liberty, or property without due process of law. Many people know of the due process protections for people accused of a crime, such as the presumption of innocence and the right to counsel. But […]

The Internet Executioner

The Internet Executioner

  by Victor Davis Hanson    In the pre-Internet age, newspaper and television reporters would need clearance from their nosy managing editors to investigate a breaking scandal or firing. Additional journalists then would go to work uncovering facts and details. There were, to be sure, feeding frenzies and misinformation in the zeal to get a scoop […]

We Are Americans

We Are Americans

By Michael Greer You remember the “shoe bomber” Richard Reid, don’t you?  Did you know he has had a trial, been found guilty and sentenced?  Did the media cover the trial?  Do you know as much about him as you know about Jodi Arias?  I didn’t think so.  Why do you think that is? What […]

The 14th Amendment- Then and Now

The 14th Amendment- Then and Now

By Richard A. Nixon, J.D. Law   The U.S. Constitution was ratified in 1789. It created the federal government, composed of three coequal and limited branches. The role of the judicial officer is to effectuate the intention of the legislature, i.e., the judicial officer must apply the laws as written to the facts of the matter […]