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Libertarianism: No Infantile Disorder

Libertarianism: No Infantile Disorder

COLUMN by Joel Schlosberg New York Times columnist Ross Douthat could use a refresher on Freudo-Marxist psychiatrists. Douthat chides libertarians — or at least “the kind of libertarian who identifies forever with his 13-year-old self” — for taking a laissez-faire attitude to “a novel, obviously addictive technology that might well be associated with depression and […]

The Money Monopoly Itself Is The Abuse

The Money Monopoly Itself Is The Abuse

COLUMN by Joel Schlosberg U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission Chair Gary Gensler might seem one of the least likely people in the world to praise Bitcoin as an example of “how technology can expand access to finance and contribute to economic growth” — while noting its founder Satoshi Nakamoto’s intentions “to create a private form […]

If You Don’t Op-Ed, Will You Get Enough?

If You Don’t Op-Ed, Will You Get Enough?

COLUMN by Joel Schlosberg After half a century, the New York Times will no longer publish an Op-Ed page — or at least not one under that name. Commentaries on the news written by contributors outside of the newspaper’s regular staff will be called “guest essays” to explain their role without using what opinion editor […]

The Finest Trick of the Developer is to Persuade You That Free Markets Should Not Exist

The Finest Trick of the Developer is to Persuade You That Free Markets Should Not Exist

COLUMN by Joel Schlosberg New York City Council candidate Alexa Aviles asserts that “the free market will never provide decent housing for all, and we should stop pretending otherwise” (“The Free Market Will Never Provide Decent Housing for All,” The Indypendent, April 2). Who’s pretending? Aviles doesn’t outright claim that the current housing market is […]

Not Free Enough to Choose

Not Free Enough to Choose

    by Joel Schlosberg Paul Krugman believes he’s discovered a flaw in the work of a fellow Nobel laureate economist. The late Milton Friedman, Krugman writes, was under the mistaken impression “that more choice is always a good thing” due to taking for granted that “people have more or less unlimited capacity to do […]

Brave New World Wide Web Revisited

Brave New World Wide Web Revisited

    by Joel Schlosberg February 8 marks the silver anniversary of an iconic early manifesto defending the Internet as a space where personal liberties and social cooperation might flourish free of political control … just in time. John Perry Barlow emailed “A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace” from the World Economic Forum the […]

Let the Twenties Roar Free

Let the Twenties Roar Free

    by Joel Schlosberg New Year’s Eve partiers had good reason to celebrate at the stroke of midnight on January 1. If the end of 2020 felt like a farewell to the missteps of more than one previous year, in a way it truly was. The culture of the year 1925 broke free from […]

No Body for President? Pay Mind.

No Body for President? Pay Mind.

    by Joel Schlosberg A celebrity who unleashed a frenzy of media attention with an unexpected win of a term in political office, despite being famed more for an outlandish personal style and uninhibited public statements than governmental experience, garnered insufficient ballots to win the 2020 US presidential election. The slightly over 1,500 votes […]

Jimmy Carter Freed Markets. Will Joe Biden?

Jimmy Carter Freed Markets. Will Joe Biden?

    By Joel Schlosberg On October 1, Jimmy Carter became the first-ever US president to live past 95 years. He enjoyed a celebratory cavalcade in Plains, Georgia.  Yet his Democratic party has ignored one of his most enduring legacies. Signing the Airline Deregulation Act, the Motor Carrier Regulatory Reform and Modernization Act, and the […]

Testing, Testing, One, Two, Zero

Testing, Testing, One, Two, Zero

    By Joel Schlosberg For this fall’s college freshmen, standardized tests weren’t as crucial in determining their selection as they would have been before 2020. Hundreds of educational institutions waived exam requirements when COVID prevented on-site administration. Some even excised the tests from the application process entirely. Yet Jeffrey Selingo reports that “something strange […]

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