The Law Firm For Non-Profits Celebrates 25th Anniversary

Studio City, CA — It started as a one-person operation intent on “helping good people do good things.” Today, a seven-person team helps guide the increasingly important work of The Law Firm for Non-Profits (LFNP), which this year proudly celebrates its 25th year anniversary.

This year’s celebration is enhanced by the announcement that Casey Summar has been named a partner in the firm.

Established as a solo practice by Arthur Rieman in Los Angeles in August 1996, LFNP opened a Santa Barbara office in 2019 and has plans to keep expanding. The firm came to prominence during the last 25 years, building working relationships with regulators and a solid reputation within the nonprofit field. The firm continues to flourish nationwide while maintaining a strong footprint in California.

LFNP has worked with more than 1,500 nonprofits devoted to the arts, animal rescue, environmental and social issues, youth sports and countless other charitable, educational, scientific and religious organizations. The firm is known for its approachability and willingness to turn complicated legalese into plain language. Its motto is: Helping good people do good things.

Summar has been vital to the firm’s growth, working closely with clients on a variety of complex matters. She came to LFNP in 2018 after 12 years practicing law in Nashville, Tenn., where she was in-house counsel and executive director for the Arts & Business Council of Greater Nashville.

“Casey adds a tremendous amount to the firm and is exceptional when it comes to managing people. She is an organizational leader,” said Rieman, LFNP’s managing partner and founder.

Summar, who is based in Santa Barbara, said she’s looking forward to getting back into a leadership role, and doing so with Rieman.

“We complement each other,” she said “What’s different about what we do is we approach our work in a collaborative fashion at our firm. Arthur has built something really special.”

Rieman holds an MBA in addition to his law degree, enabling him to offer contextualized knowledge and insights, crafting legal solutions that avoid disparate harm to nonprofit organizations.

“We explain the pros and cons so the client has tools to weigh options and make the best decision for the organization, not just from a legal perspective,” he said.


Get Citizensjournal.us Headlines free SUBSCRIPTION. Keep us publishing – DONATE

 

0 0 votes
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments