The Significance of the Hong Kong Protests

 

 

By Sigrid Weidenweber

Anyone following the news lately has been apprised of Hong Kong’s major revolt. On Sunday, June 9, 2019 more than a million people, or one in seven residents in this city, protested in the streets. They march in protest of a new draconian law put forth by the Communist Chinese government representative, Chief Executive Carrie Law. The Executive has refused to withdraw the bill or step down despite the volatile protests. It seems quite clear that Carrie Law is an agent of the Beijing government, placed in the executive position.

Since Sunday’s protests did not achieve results, the protesters, mainly young people and students, a smaller crowd this time, returned to the streets. The protests, non-violent marches in the beginning, turned violent when police claimed stones were thrown, and used tear gas and rubber bullets to deter the crowd.

Jillian Kay Melchior, writing for the Wall Street Journal, reports that tear gas was so thick that her skin felt the burn. She mentions umbrellas being thrown from windows and walkways above, floating down like parachutes to the protesters, who used them to shield themselves from the tear gas.

The law, so violently protested and rejected, allows the Hong Kong government to send anyone within the confines of the city to mainland China for trial on alleged offenses. China’s judicial system is well known for being ruthless and shrouded in nebulous, secretive proceedings.

The people of Hong Kong have every right to be afraid for their future. The new law would negate Hong Kong’s legal independence, and allow Hong Kong citizens, as well as foreigners to be extradited to mainland china. Most of all, pro-democracy activists, religious congregants, journalists and businessmen are targets, and would be quickly sent across the border.

The most important loss for all Hong Kong residents would be the freedom of expression, the freedom of assembly and every other law granted under current Hong Kong statutes. More even, not only would the citizens lose these freedoms, but in China they would face, besides false accusations and predetermined sentences, torture and inhumane conditions.

The young people of Hong Kong are especially aware and afraid of this law and its total control of their lives, for they know well what Communism is! They know from the lives of their people on the mainland that, if this law is instituted, they will be free people no more—but will be living under totalitarian, draconian rule that is the hallmark of all Socialism and Communism.

Having lived under Communism myself, I pray and hope that their protests will accomplish the withdrawal of the terrible law.  


 Sigrid Weidenweber grew up in communist East Berlin, escaping it using a French passport. Ms. Weidenweber holds a degree in medical technology as well as psychology and has course work in Anthropology.  She is co-founder of Aid for Afghans.  Weidenweber has traveled the world and lived with Pakistani Muslims, learning about the culture and religion. She is a published author and lecturer. You can find her books on Amazon.com


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